Clubs that scan IDs on entry

Electronman
Too much of a good thing is never enough
Sunday, November 28, 2021 8:52 AM
I've read reviews of clubs that scan your ID before allowing entry. What is the rationale for scanning the ID? Quite obviously, the club can verify the age of a customer without scanning the ID. Are they checking your ID against a data base? If so, what kind of data base would be relevant? Are they simply keeping a record of who entered the club on a given day? This seems like an unnecessary invasion of privacy (although the number of facial recognition cameras in public places have ended most expectations of privacy). What is the collective wisdom about turning over your ID for scanning: nothing to worry about? Or refuse and go to a different club?

30 comments

I would hesitate to let a strip club scan my ID. You don't know what could happen to your info. I've never encountered an ID scanning but I have been patted down.
jackslash
3 years ago
Fairly common at high end night clubs as well. I thought it was to prevent fake ID's, but may be a way to hold individuals accountable if something happens. It may become more common now especially in places that require vaccination for admission.
PredragDr
3 years ago
I've never encountered it but assumed that it is a form of defense in the event something happens at the club requiring police. I think I would turn around and go some where else.
shadowcat
3 years ago
I've seen it and I would think in most cases it's what shadowcat said. I still go but I don't like it. But I see more and more clubs doing it. It might act as a deterrent for 2amer crap in the club. For those that use cards, not me, but somebody just posted an article where the club used the signature on the card to forge a credit card signature for bullshit charges.
Muddy
3 years ago
Just say no, hold the line
twentyfive
3 years ago
Godivas in Greenville,Sc scans id's. That is why I don't go there any more. I will go to a club that scans id's.
bang69
3 years ago
Google bar ID scanners and read a bit of the marketing materials. There's been a bunch of threads on it lately. The scanners are often part of a larger bar management package. It'll come with point of sale system, inventory management, etc. I mostly avoid clubs I know scan ID's and walk away from ones I find out do it unexpectedly. But, it's not 100%.
Dolfan
3 years ago
Just say no.
skibum609
3 years ago
ilbbaicnl
3 years ago
Interesting article^^ But the rationale is BS. How would the scan link to information to identify people with a history of violence and sexual assault? But if the scanner linked to the TUSCL data base and gave TUSCL mongers a discount on high mileage private dances.......
Electronman
3 years ago
No fucking way. Same reason I only use cash at a strip club.
Studme53
3 years ago
Something bad happens at the club that has nothing to do with you and the cops show up at your house to interview a potential witness. No thanks.
Studme53
3 years ago
Absolute deal breaker. I wouldn't allow that at Target or Wally World, but I'm going to give all my personal info to the girl collecting cover at the entrance to a strip club. No way. If everyone just laughed and walked away this bullshit wouldn't last even one shift.
datinman
3 years ago
I haven't seen these in California. But I wouldn't mind allowing my ID to be scanned if asked; I don't have an SO to worry about finding out so not a blackmail target. And I like the idea that it might reduce the potential for a 2AM'er. I'm also not worried about the Club giving my info to LE. If I'm going to get caught in an ITC raid, that info won't matter one way or the other. And if the club sells my data, that's a risk, but it's also illegal and if proved, the club faces significant consequences. But I absolutely WILL NOT use a card for any purchases in that club. Just like I don't use my card now without such ID scans. I developed the discipline needed to ensure I never spend over my allocated cash in a club a long time ago. Interesting story about cops showing up at my house: Earlier this year, I was hosting an A-List porn star at my home for one of our Sugar dates. About 15 minutes after she arrived, before we had started anything salacious, there's knock at my door. It was a local PD officer investigating a stolen car that had been abandoned and parked at the curb across the street from my home. The cops had canvassed the block for witnesses and this guy noticed my Ring camera. He asked me if I could review the cam video for any footage of the perp. I told him I'd check and he gave me an email address to send whatever I could find. Now my popular porn star Sugar date heard the entire conversation, though she stayed out of sight of the door. Obviously, she did not want video of her walking into my home to be provided to LAPD detectives! She had no doubt that eventually she would be recognized. Nor did she want any video of her car parked in front of my house to be sent either. So we went into my home office and reviewed the video together. Eventually I produced a carefully edited clip that showed ONLY the stolen car and the perp, and she was ok with me sending it to the cops. But I was lucky that she was cool about the whole thing. That could have gone south in a hurry. So why did I tell this story? Humble Brag? Partially. But also to point out that your ID data is just data. They key issue with having your ID swiped is really about what the club will DO with the data.
herbtcat
3 years ago
@Studme I would hope that competent police detectives, honestly looking for leads on a case, would get it that many of the potential witnesses in a strip club would be husbands on the down low. They would make an effort to keep you on the down low with the missus, since they want you to be cooperative. But there's plenty of evidence we're not picky enough about who gets a police badge.
ilbbaicnl
3 years ago
They got the pussy and titties inside. Scan away. Not a fan, but honestly don't understand all the whining about it. They do it regularly at three clubs I go to. Security breaches at Target and Discover worry me a helluva out more than Hi-Liter scanning my driver's license.
Chili Palmer
3 years ago
This has been discussed several times before. I don't let strip clubs scan my ID. The rationale is that strip clubs are not filled with the most scrupulous people, and I'm not a fan of identity theft.
Call.Me.Ishmael
3 years ago
Scanning you ID wouldn't be a way for some one to commit identity theft. Any info on your driver license is all readily available and not useful for that purpose at all.
TMQ
3 years ago
It seems simple to me: if you cause trouble, skip out on paying for dances, got banned from another club under the same mgmt group, etc., they save and flag your info to prohibit further entry. If you don't give them a reason, your info isn't saved. In a time of increased violence and 2'amers, it is only practical. I do not like it but, of the three worthwhile clubs in my area, two are under same management and require it, including the best of the three.
gammanu95
3 years ago
My driver's license has my full name, date of birth, home address, my likeness, and physical descriptors. All of those things can be used for identity theft or to generate fake IDs. The information on your driver's license can also be sold and then correlated with larger databases of stolen information to build out a current record to make larger-scale identity theft easier. Does it happen every single day at every single club?... no. But I like less risk with my PII, and not getting my ID scanned at a titty bar is low-hanging fruit. If you believe it's perfectly safe, then go for it.
Call.Me.Ishmael
3 years ago
^ it’s worse than that. In many states, the magnetic strip that is scanned contains additional information that isn’t printed in the DL.
mark94
3 years ago
^^^ I've heard that as well, but haven't looked into it that closely. There's already enough identifiable information on a driver's license to convince me to not hand it over to a strip club (or other riskier businesses and services).
Call.Me.Ishmael
3 years ago
From the SS govt website Use of the SSN in State drivers license systems is already authorized by Federal law, and 29 States currently use the SSN as the drivers license number or show it on the license. The 1996 immigration reform provision on improved identification-related documents requires the SSN to be included on State drivers licenses by the year 2000. Thus, the drivers license and Social Security card can both be used to verify the SSN.
mark94
3 years ago
It's been stated several times that strip clubs tend to attract some of the seedier members of society. Even if you're not concerned about ID theft (although you should be) just think about the fact that they get access to your home address. Next time you "check in" at the club, they know you're not at home for the next couple hours.
misterorange
3 years ago
Very Jersey/Philly story. About 25 years ago a New Jersey State Police “Major Crimes” detective left a cryptic message on my answering machine to call him about a homicide investigation. Mrs. Stud heard it first. I told her I had no idea what it was about but would call the guy the next day. It stressed me out. Turns out a mobster’s body was dumped down the road from a diner I had used my credit card at - I guess around the time the body was dumped. I had an innocent explanation for my wife but taught me a lesson about paper trails.
Studme53
3 years ago
Years ago, I got a call from an out-of-state homicide detective. What did I know about so-and-so and her murder ? Why was I in her address book ? After 5 minutes of grilling me, he read me the phone number from the address book. He had misdialed. Barney Fife.
mark94
3 years ago
I work in an industry that has to scan ID's. All that happens is the device we put the license into tell us if it is fake or not. That's it. It does not record anything. I'm not saying that every device is like that, but many are. Just some added info, and context to the discussion.
BumHip
3 years ago
The databases aren't just stored locally on that device, or even on the club. They're often stored on servers managed by the companies that supply them. One server or cloud service or whatever may have data from many customers, making it a relatively high value target for bad actors. I'm much, much more concerned about data leaks via incompetence or lack of concern on the part of the strip club or the ID Scanner vendor than I am a club employee maliciously using the data. I just can't see them pulling some scheme where they try to rob my house while I'm at the club or any variation on that. I can see some other more sophisticated criminal acquiring the drivers license data though. TooOld, I really, really doubt that. There may be some who only claim to detect fakes and keep no records, but those are the exception not the rule. Particularly when it comes to Bar/Club scanners. The business value is in the data they collect.
Dolfan
3 years ago
You can debate the intricacies and the variables of technology ad nauseum. But I know that, however you break it down, I have less risk if I don't allow my ID to be scanned. I'll choose less risk whenever I can.
Call.Me.Ishmael
3 years ago
@mark “ Use of the SSN in State drivers license systems is already authorized by Federal law, and 29 States currently use the SSN as the drivers license number or show it on the license. The 1996 immigration reform provision on improved identification-related documents requires the SSN to be included on State drivers licenses by the year 2000. Thus, the drivers license and Social Security card can both be used to verify the SSN.” Fake news. Any State or political subdivision thereof (and any person acting as an agent of such an agency or instrumentality), in the administration of any driver’s license or motor vehicle registration law within its jurisdiction, may not display a social security account number issued by the Commissioner of Social Security (or any derivative of such number) on any driver’s license, motor vehicle registration, or personal identification card (as defined in section 7212(a)(2) of the 9/11 Commission Implementation Act of 2004), or include, on any such license, registration, or personal identification card, a magnetic strip, bar code, or other means of communication which conveys such number (or derivative thereof). Section 7214 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 42 USC 405(c)(2)(C)(vi)(II) [view link]
Hank Moody
3 years ago
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